Heidi Armbrewster

Heidi Armbrewster

Kaliswa Brewster

Kaliswa Brewster

Chris Henry Coffey

Chris Henry Coffey

Naomi Lorrain

Naomi Lorrain

Jared McNeill

Jared McNeill

Jennifer Mudge

Jennifer Mudge

Postell Pringle

Postell Pringle

Samira Wiley

Samira Wiley

Tamara Sevunts

Tamara Sevunts

Stew

Stew

Creative Team

presented in partnership with LeFrak Center, Lakeside and Prospect Park Alliance

Starring

Heidi Armbruster, Kaliswa Brewster, Chris Henry Coffey, Naomi Lorrain, Jared McNeill, Jennifer Mudge, Postell Pringle, Tamara Sevunts, Samira Wiley

Director: Lucie Tiberghien

Producer: Garth Belcon

Production Designer: Kris Stone

Production Manager: Thyra Hartshorn

Video Programing and Technology Consultant: Andy Carluccio

Composer: Stew

Synopsis

 

​In The Misanthrope, a society built upon a fragile foundation of up-front politeness and behind-the-back gossip is subjected to Alceste’s wrecking ball of bluntness and disdain for social norms. Ironically, Alceste is madly in love with Célimène, a skilled socialite who deftly navigates the shark-filled waters of polite society in her relentless goal for independence. Can such opposites ever hope to find common ground? In a time of fake news, fake politicians, and the increasing normalization of hypocrisy, Molière’s classic comedy The Misanthrope is a refreshingly biting satire with humor tailor-made for a contemporary Twitter account.

Praise for The Misanthrope

"When the cast reappeared to take their Zoom bows, inclining their heads toward their computer cameras, they were greeted with written “bravo”s and the sound—joyful to imagine—of many yellow hand emojis clapping."

- The New Yorker - Alexandra Schwartz

“I was surprised how much it affected me. I felt that I was sitting in the theater!”

- Audience Reaction

“That might be the best Misanthrope I’ve ever seen. Those actors are perfection. And I kind of think Molière was writing for Zoom and didn’t know it.”

- Audience Reaction

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THE MISANTHROPE

Translated by Richard Wilbur

May 2nd, 2020

"Choose a classic text—preferably not too long, preferably funny—get good actors to perform it into their devices, and voilà.”

-The New Yorker