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Cocktails and food will start at 6pm

Performance will begin at 7:30 pm (Running Time 100 minutes without intermission.)

 

Your $150 ticket (a tax deductible donation) will include:

  • a raffle ticket to win (1 in 200 odds!) a week stay in a 5 bedroom gorgeous and newly renovated chalet in the French Alps valued at $2500* (see listing here)

  • a raffle ticket to win walk-on part in one of our upcoming productions

  • Cocktails, hors d'oeuvres by Night Kitchen and desert by Michel et Augustin.

  • Bragging rights for attending the official Opening Night performance of Molière in the Park's first ever full scale production!

*valid for a year and subject to blackout dates

Please be advised that Molière in the Park will be following all NYC COVID mandates for outdoor events.

 

Cast:

Maechi Aharanwa, Janie Brookshire, Chris Henry Coffey, Gabriel Ebert, Danaya Esperanza, Margaret Ivey, Nate Miller, Kate Siahaan-Rigg, Aline Salloum.

Directed by: Lucie Tiberghien

Translated by: Richard Wilbur

 

In English.

 

The Story

Alceste is full of rightful disdain for the hypocrisy and social norms of his contemporaries. Ironically, he is madly in love with the queen of social butterflies, Célimène, a radiant seductress who deftly navigates the incessant chatter of her friend network in her endless quest for independence.

When Alceste suddenly decides that Célimène MUST choose between him and her frivolous world, well, in true Molière comedic style, the clash and its aftermaths are like nothing he could have predicted.

 

A note from Director Lucie Tiberghien:

What is The Misanthrope? Is it a play about a commendable, honest man, Alceste, who heroically sacrifices everything to denounce the lies of his peers and loved ones? Or is it about a reprehensible extremist, a madman, who would rather destroy everything in his path and abandon everyone, including the woman he loves, rather than compromise even just a little?Molière never tells us where he stands, and therein lies the beauty and humor of this rich and opaque portrait of eight aristocrats in 1666. Except that in our diverse production, 400 years after Molière was born, the time is now. These characters’ personal relationship to the truth, freedom, gender, race and ultimately love, will be experienced through today’s lens. And since theater IS after all, first and foremost an opportunity for communal reflection, complex and essential questions will be raised.No matter what side of the great divide we are on, how do we love or simply exercise our freedoms, in the face of such unfathomable hypocrisy and, most importantly, the weight of this country's history?